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A GOOD AMERICAN: THE WILLIAM BINNEY STORY

 
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ACCLAIMED AND AWARD WINNING DOCUMENTARY

A GOOD AMERICAN: Life of NSA WHISTLEBLOWER WILLIAM BINNEY

GUESTS INCLUDE William Binney, Ray McGovern, Coleen Rowley , Film Director Fritz Moser

Plus, Effective NY's Bill Samuels on NY People's Convention

The NSA could have easily prevented the 2001 World Trade Center attacks. So claims a convincing, if evidence-light, documentary about whistleblower William Binney. View the trailer below!

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THE GUARDIAN review

A Good American review: fascinating revelations about the NSA's role in 9/11

[NSA whistleblower William Binney, the subject of A Good American.]
“Gifted, visionary, focused and determined” … NSA whistleblower William Binney, the subject of A Good American. Photograph: PR

Despite the controversy over Edward Snowden’s revelations of US surveillance of its citizens, it’s easy to imagine the country’s security services privately not being that embarrassed: there might be professional pride in overzealous snooping.

But such bodies’ role in 9/11 is another matter entirely. What if it could be shown that the NSA could have – should have – prevented the attacks on the World Trade Center; that its failure to do so wasn’t due to bad luck, but a lethal cocktail of incompetence, arrogance and greed; and that they then sought to cover up their mistakes?

This possibility is the driver of a fascinating, conspiracy theorising documentary: Friedrich Moser’s A Good American, which premieres on Tuesday at the CPH:DOX film festival in Copenhagen. It may not have the contemporaneous frisson of Laura Poitras’s Oscar-winning Citizenfour, but it certainly packs a punch.

The American of the title is William Binney, Bill to his friends, a crypto-mathematician and former NSA analyst, who devised a surveillance and analysis system that was cut-price, had built-in privacy protections, was up-and-running in 2000, and so dazzlingly effective that he claims it “absolutely would have prevented 9/11”, if only the agency hadn’t wilfully ignored it. The documentary doesn’t categorically prove the case – ironically for a film about data, we need to see some, or have more collaborations than are offered. Yet it does make us believe.

Binney is familiar as a high-profile NSA whistleblower who, like Snowden, has spoken out against the agency’s mass surveillance and abuses of privacy, which is what prompted his resignation in October 2001. But it’s no coincidence that he left so soon after 9/11, and the film focuses on his achievements and frustrations in the years up to and immediately after the terrorist attack.


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